Bodybuilding Twins Jumped To Their Deaths In ‘Suicide Pact’

Bodybuilding Twins Jumped To Their Deaths In 'Suicide Pact'

In a terrible “suicide pact,” two bodybuilding twins plunged to their deaths from a tower block window, an inquest heard.

Marcis and Armands Graudins, both 33 years old, were sadly discovered next to one another outside Wickets Tower in Edgbaston on March 2 of this year. Their deaths were reported at Birmingham Coroner’s Court.

After disclosing their mental health difficulties to friends, the brothers jumped from an open window of their shared apartment.

The brothers’ deaths had been verified by paramedics who had arrived on the scene, the court was informed. Although steroids and “associated paraphernalia” were discovered in their apartment, BirminghamLive reports that this did not cause or contribute to their deaths.

Just a few weeks before they passed away, Marcis confided in a doctor that he had considered suicide and had been “measuring windows,” but that he would not do it “because of the effect it would have on his twin brother.”

Armands, who confessed to his coworkers that he “didn’t want to get old,” also declared that if his twin passed away, “he would go too.”

Senior Coroner Louise Hunt determined that both boys’ deaths were caused by suicide and “multiple injuries” brought on by a fall from a height. At Birmingham Coroner’s Court today, Tuesday, June 28, their inquests came to an end one after the other.

The court was also informed that the “avid gym-goers” were “quiet neighbors who kept themselves to themselves and were often together,” which led to details of the brothers’ battles with anxiety and steroid use.

The coroner stated that two witnesses heard a loud bang or thud at 3 am “but did not look or check to see what happened.”

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A “very distraught” caretaker who found the two deaths as he arrived for his shift at the block alerted the police after he found them.

The employee initially thought they were two homeless individuals, but upon closer study realized they were residents. When officers arrived after calling 999, they discovered the males on the grassy area outside the high rise with a large open window above.

Coworkers recognized the two single men who were brothers. Despite having narcotics in his system, Marcis was a successful agent and they had no bearing on his behavior or eventual demise.

Bodybuilding Twins Jumped To Their Deaths In 'Suicide Pact'

The coroner’s court heard that he had a history of injecting steroids into his ankles. He also struggled with social anxiety, and he turned to bodybuilding as a coping mechanism.

He reiterated that Armands was his “protective factor” and that he would not try suicide as a result in a subsequent session in February. Mrs. Hunt noted a suicide conclusion and said: “He was discovered outside his apartment by a caretaker who was on his way to work. He was discovered near to his deceased brother.

“The deceased had been experiencing anxiousness and a bad mood. He was much better when his doctor last saw him, and he planned to look into getting counseling via his job.”

The court heard testimony about how Armands, an assistant production supervisor, used steroids and other medications that were obtained “from the black market.”

His boss said he was a “helpful guy” and “extremely focused” in a statement, but added that “he had always indicated he didn’t want to get old” and didn’t want a family.

Additionally, Armands revealed to his boss that he and his brother were the only people left in their family house in Latvia when they were 12 or 13 years old.

After hearing his boss’s comments, Mrs. Hunt added: “He frequently pledged to leave too if his brother perished. We came together, we go together, he would say.

The court was informed that when he last saw him, on February 15, he was “trying to converse, but couldn’t.” He requested Armands to write down what he wanted to say because he was having trouble speaking.

His boss had stated: “I knew his sibling had been admitted to the hospital. I won’t be coming back; I’ll meet you on the other side, he wrote.

My parents were in a car accident and are in a coma, he stated. From what he was writing, it was obvious he was mentally ill.”

Armands, who had been using Zanex for anxiety, was transferred to the hospital in an ambulance after being contacted. As there was “no fear concerning suicidal ideology,” he was released that day.

Tragically, the couple’s bodies were discovered less than two weeks later.

The coroner concluded that although he did not overdose on anti-depressants directly before his death, it may have contributed to his behavior.

As the inquests came to a close, Mrs. Hunt sent their family her sympathies.

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